A Quick Update

In 2010, we moved back to the small town in Colorado that I never stopped missing while we lived in Mexico. Now I sometimes miss Mexico, but I wouldn't travel as freely as we did when we were there, camping out in remote areas and so forth.

Mexico today is in a period of change, and in many ways it is more dangerous now. That said, I have plenty of American friends who still live there very happily, just taking a few more precautions than they did in the past.

Just to say!

Rosana

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Expedia is my favorite place to book airfare, and they handle hotels, car rentals, cruises, etc. I like the organization of the site for figuring out what flights I want. Click on the suitcase to take a look.

I was very pleased to win an award for this blog! Even better for you: click through for lists of all sorts of award-winning travel blogs.

Tripbase Blog Awards 2009

Tripbase Blog Awards 2009

I almost didn’t buy Frommer’s Mexico 2009 , by David Baird and Lynne Bairstow, as I already had Lonely Planet Mexico and the Rough Guide to Mexico. But then I remembered that  when we roamed Mexico in our RV with just the Lonely Planet, I had wished I’d had more Mexican guidebooks.

I’ve been very glad of Frommer’s Mexico. You do have to be aware that it covers the more popular locations of Mexico, leaving out a lot of places — like much of northern Mexico, or central Mexican cities that are not the main tourism attractions.

The subtitle of Frommer’s Mexico is “With the best beaches, ruins, and resorts,” and this reflects its approach, to describe for you what its writers find to be the best of Mexico. This distinguishes it from other more comprehensive guidebooks, and also gives it plenty of room to be quite thorough on the places it does describe.

For example, in Guanajuato, one of my favorite places in Mexico, I really appreciated the details. I’m hardly a world-class shopper, and I saved some time by seeking out a few of the shops from Frommer’s recommendations. Neither of the other two guidebooks gave shopping suggestions.

I do think Lonely Planet is better for budget travel. Some things that Frommer’s called inexpensive seemed pretty high to me. But then, I first used Frommer’s guides when I was a student in Europe in the 1960s, using Frommer’s Europe on $5 a Day and usually spending less than that! Alas, those days are long gone…

The book begins with a chapter called “The Best of Mexico,” which has sections on the best beach vacations, the best cultural experiences, the best archaeological sites, the best active vacations, the best shopping, the hottest nightlife, and so on. I was a little skeptical — after all, how do you decide what “the best” really is? But when I looked at their lists, they generally seemed to me to be excellent guidelines. Often they feature little-known treasures.

After a chapter on planning your trip to Mexico and some other introductory matter, the chapters discuss various places:

  • Mexico City
  • Taxco to Tepoztlan
  • San Miguel de Allende and the Colonial Silver cities
  • Michoacan (Morelia, monarch butterflies, Patzcuaro, and Uruapan)
  • Guadalajara
  • Puerto Vallarta and the central Pacific coast
  • Acapulco and the southern Pacific coast
  • Oaxaca and Chiapas
  • Veracruz and Puebla
  • Cancun
  • Isla Mujeres and Cozumel
  • The Caribbean coast
  • Merida, Chichen Itza, and the Maya interior
  • The Copper Canyon

The book ends with a few pages of history and Spanish vocabulary.

As we’ve traveled, I’ve become more fond of Frommer’s Mexico. It has a lot of personality!

Click on the image to check it out at Amazon:

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