A Quick Update

In 2010, we moved back to the small town in Colorado that I never stopped missing while we lived in Mexico. Now I sometimes miss Mexico, but I wouldn't travel as freely as we did when we were there, camping out in remote areas and so forth.

Mexico today is in a period of change, and in many ways it is more dangerous now. That said, I have plenty of American friends who still live there very happily, just taking a few more precautions than they did in the past.

Just to say!

Rosana

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Expedia is my favorite place to book airfare, and they handle hotels, car rentals, cruises, etc. I like the organization of the site for figuring out what flights I want. Click on the suitcase to take a look.

I was very pleased to win an award for this blog! Even better for you: click through for lists of all sorts of award-winning travel blogs.

Tripbase Blog Awards 2009

Tripbase Blog Awards 2009

April 19, 2005 — In many ways, we lead very American lives here in Mexico. We both work on our websites several hours a day, taking turns with our one laptop and internet connection. Some days work is pretty much all we do. But often other things come along.

Take today, for example. Kelly often gets up before me nowadays and gets online first. I got my turn when he went out in mid-morning, to say goodbye to a Mexican friend who is moving away tomorrow and to go to the glass store to arrange for glass delivery tomorrow, assuming the glass arrives at the store this afternoon and gets cut. Kelly is remodeling a very old metal door-and-window frame that our landlord had lying around. Kelly has already roofed the patio, and when the glass is in place, that whole area will become more of an indoor space.

While he was away, I tackled updating a website I have about my father’s science fiction, cordwainer-smith.com. About once a year I check over my older sites for bad links, out of date comments, and so on. Since we’re getting ready to be in Mexico more, we’re going to stop carrying some of my father’s books ourselves and just link to Amazon instead. So it was a lot of nitty gritty work of that sort.

I stopped briefly for some brunch that Kelly cooked up after he got back. His outing had been successful, and we chatted about that over fruit salad and quesadillas. I went back to my website for a while, and just as I was beginning to go nuts from too many details, I heard Kelly at the door downstairs, welcoming our friends Pancho and Diana, with their young daughter Cheka, who’s three or four.

They stayed and visited for an hour or more. Our cat decided the best place to be was under the bed, and all of Cheka’s efforts to coax her out were a failure — except for one brief moment which inspired further efforts from Cheka. We all shot the bull, and Kelly and I learned some Mexican slang which I will not repeat here. Kelly pulled out a photo album and we showed them our families and home in Colorado.

We’d offered them water or juice but didn’t really have any good snacks on hand, till one of the old-lady vendors came to the door. She sells some delicious sweet breads that I buy from her in the plaza, and just a couple of days ago she had learned where we live, so now she comes by sometimes. Her timing was perfect, so we bought some of the bread to offer our guests. It happened to be right in the middle of Cheka and me pretending to offer Pancho a toy snake to eat on a plate with salt and salsa, so there was general jollity going on. We told Pancho he had to eat his snake first.


Cheka terrifies me with the snake.

After they left, the cat stayed under the bed just in case. I took a nap and woke to purring beside me. Kelly had had a turn at the computer and he let me go back to my website, as he had some other projects around the house in mind.

Later, while I was cooking dinner, I took a bucket of water a few doors down the street to water the geraniums and bougainvillea that a friend has in front of her house. She’s only here on the weekends. After dinner, I went a couple of blocks down the street to a little grocery store run by a young man from Mexico City. I bought a few things, we chatted in English, and I visited his friendly dogs.

On my way downhill, I chatted with a Mexican woman going the same way. It hit ninety degrees here this afternoon, and the evening was delicious. She said that last May they had a spell of December-like weather. On my way back up hill, a very pretty young woman asked me if I knew of any work, which I didn’t.

Determined to wrap up the website in one day if I could, I bumped Kelly off the computer. He was quite willing to go out into the delicious evening himself, so he went for a walk. Less than an hour later, I heard him calling me from the street. Our friend Juvenal was teaching a group of young women some traditional dancing (probably Chichimeca, as that is his background) in the jardin, or main plaza. We could hear the drumming from the house. Kelly had no trouble luring me away from the computer, and as we walked back down the hill, we guessed that they were preparing for a festival coming up here in a couple of weeks.

It was pure magic around the circle of half a dozen dancers. Someone was drumming, Juvenal was dancing, playing his guitar, and singing, while the women pretty much knew the steps and were dancing in a circle. Here and there, people were sitting enjoying the dancing and the evening. I greeted Juvenal’s wife Ana and another friend, and watched. Now and then Juvenal would admonish the dancers to have an attitude of thanks and appreciation in the dancing. When they finally quit, we said our goodnights. As Kelly and I strolled out of the plaza, he commented that the dancing felt like it had never stopped from the most ancient of times till now.

Back home, I finished up an email to my sister and thought I’d blog about all this. That website work can wait till manana.

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