A Quick Update

In 2010, we moved back to the small town in Colorado that I never stopped missing while we lived in Mexico. Now I sometimes miss Mexico, but I wouldn't travel as freely as we did when we were there, camping out in remote areas and so forth.

Mexico today is in a period of change, and in many ways it is more dangerous now. That said, I have plenty of American friends who still live there very happily, just taking a few more precautions than they did in the past.

Just to say!

Rosana

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ninosjovenes-horsesMarch 27, 2008 – Ninos y Jovenes in San Juan Cosala, Jalisco, is a school which has existed for many years. Founded by Padre Macias, who was for a long time the priest at the church in San Juan Cosala, it is located on the edge of town, with the mountains right behind it. This photo, which Kelly took during the rainy season, shows the entrance to it. I don’t know whose horses these are.

ninosjovenes-padre3 The school is just a few blocks from where we live, so recently I have gone there a couple of times to visit the priest. Padre Macias, or Padre Beto as many call him, is in his early 80s and still sharp as can be. He knows some English, but we conversed in Spanish, which he was adept at slowing down for us. If he thought we didn’t catch a particular word, he often tossed in the English one. Our young friend Peter was with us yesterday, and his Spanish is more limited than ours. Padre Macias told a couple of jokes. Kelly and I got one but not the other, and I think Peter missed them both!

ninosjovenes-padre1 The priest told us that Ninos y Jovenes currently houses about 120 students. Some 40 of them are indigenous: Huicholes, Coras, and others. When the indigenous students first come, they often don’t speak Spanish very fluently since it isn’t their first language, but within a few months, they are doing great, he reported… most of them would have studied it in school for up to three years in primary school.  The other students are from San Juan Cosala and other areas. Some of the students are orphans, but others may have living parents who cannot care for them for one reason or another. Also, there are day students from here in town because their parents think it’s the best education.

ninosjovenes-padre2 I have no idea how the school operates financially, but I am sure any help would be most welcome. So far as I know, neither the government nor the church is a major factor. I have heard that there are some local people who help in various ways. There is a staff, including an English teacher I met briefly. I found it very inspiring to meet and talk with Padre Macias.

One Response to “Visiting Ninos y Jovenes”

  • LETICAOTERO says:

    GRACIASPOR ESCRIBIR SOBRE MI PADRE BETO YA YO SOY UNA DE SUS HIJAS VVIEN ESA CASA POR 12 ANOS LOS MAS FELICES DE MI VIDA SI TIENES MAS INFORMACION O COMO ESCRIBIRLE AL PADRE SE LO AGRADESCO.

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